Wednesday, May 29, 2024

Cashmere Legion Auxiliary honors veterans with poppies on Memorial Day

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CASHMERE—The Cashmere American Legion Auxiliary volunteers will distribute handcrafted red poppies on Friday, May 10, in honor of America's veterans. The volunteers will be stationed outside Doanes Valley Pharmacy and inside Martins Market Place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The annual event coincides with Memorial Day and pays tribute to veterans who have served their country for decades. Memorial Day, originally known as Decoration Day, is a day when Americans remember and honor their ancestral family members who have served in the military.

The poppy tradition originated from the poem "In Flanders Fields," written by Lt. Co. John McCrae during World War I. The poem refers to the poppies that grew out of newly dug soldiers' graves in Europe. In 1921, the American Legion Auxiliary adopted the poppy as its memorial flower and started the Poppy Program in 1924. Today, Auxiliary members distribute millions of poppies in exchange for contributions to assist military veterans and their families. The poppies are distributed by donation only and never sold.

The Cashmere American Legion Auxiliary encourages everyone to remember the significance of the poppy and the meaning of Memorial Day. They urge the community to take the time to reflect and honor those who have given their lives in service to the country.

In addition to the poppy distribution, the Auxiliary will be placing over 1,000 small flags on the graves of veterans and auxiliary members at the Cashmere Cemetery on Saturday, May 25, starting at 9:00 am. Volunteers are welcome to assist with this effort.

The Cashmere American Legion Post #64 is also planning its annual "Cavalcade of Flags" ceremony on Monday, May 27, at 11:00 am, with nearly 500 large flags on display. Commander Ken Komro is seeking volunteers to help with the event and can be reached at 509-782-4972 for more information.

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